Procter and Gamble Awards Grants to Clean Water Student Projects at Embry-Riddle

Embry-Riddle students stand with local Haitians who have received access to clean water through Project Haiti, a student engineering project at the Daytona Beach Campus that designs and installs water purification systems.

“We recognize that these programs prepare students for careers in business by creating environments that encourage and enhance innovation and creativity.”

Rebecca Jetter, P&G Higher Education Grant Program Leader

Two Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University student projects, Project Haiti and Make Every Water Drop Count: Protecting U.S. Southwest Waters, have been awarded grants through the Procter and Gamble (P&G) Fund’s highly competitive Higher Education Grant Program.

“P&G is proud to support Project Haiti and Make Every Water Drop Count: Protecting U.S. Southwest Waters at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University,” said Rebecca Jetter, leader of the P&G Higher Education Grant Program. “We recognize that these programs prepare students for careers in business by creating environments that encourage and enhance innovation and creativity.”

This is the third consecutive year that Project Haiti has received a $10,000 grant from The P&G Fund of The Greater Cincinnati Foundation. Project Haiti is a student engineering project at Embry-Riddle’s Daytona Beach, Fla., campus that designs and installs water purification systems for Haitians who lack access to clean water.

“The Procter and Gamble support is critical to educating our engineering and business students who are building real-world micro-businesses in Haiti,” said Marc Compere, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at Embry-Riddle who leads Project Haiti. “Our students design, build and test the solar-powered water purifier in the laboratory, and then take it to Haiti to launch a new water selling business. This provides new jobs, recurring income and improves community health.”

While in country, Project Haiti students also offer hygiene and sanitation training programs, and create sustainable micro-businesses that provide employment for citizens and income for local orphanages and schools.

“We have launched five water selling businesses in Haiti and gain experience each year,” said Compere. “The P&G support allows our students to work on a collaborative, hands-on engineering project that forces them to operate in a fluid, highly unstructured environment to achieve their goal.”

Every Drop Counts

Students from the Embry-Riddle Prescott Campus Weather Club, a student chapter of the American Meteorological Society, will use climate data and satellite images to study changes in weather and surface water in California and Arizona.

This is the first year that Embry-Riddle’s Prescott Campus received a $5,000 grant from P&G for its Make Every Water Drop Count: Protecting U.S. Southwest Waters project. The project is led by Dorothea Ivanova, associate professor of applied aviation sciences at Embry-Riddle’s Prescott Campus, and the Embry-Riddle Weather Club, which is a student chapter of the American Meteorological Society. The students will use available local climate data and years of available Landsat satellite images to study changes in California and Arizona rivers and natural surface water. The project includes environmental monitoring and the establishment of water conservation guidelines.

“The P&G grant will allow students to be involved in the environmental outreach effort to protect Arizona’s waters and to research the U. S. Southwest drought using satellite remote sensing,” said Ivanova. “The students want to be active participants in disseminating information about water conservation to the local community, high schools, middle schools and farmers, thereby improving environmental education.”

The funds will help the Embry-Riddle Weather Club purchase computer equipment, satellite image processing software and supplies for community workshops and presentations.

The P&G Fund Higher Education Grant Program provides support for U.S. college and university projects that will better prepare students for success in business.

“These programs will not only be impacting the students participating, but also the communities involved,” said Jetter of the two Embry-Riddle projects. “We see this as an important investment that we hope benefits students for years to come.”

Questions? Contact:
Melanie Stawicki Azam
azamm@erau.edu
Communications
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